World VoIP NewsAustralian VoIP PBX provider Vixtel acquires CloudTC Australian VoIP PBX provider Vixtel acquires CloudTC

Australian VoIP PBX provider Vixtel acquires CloudTC


Australian VoIP PBX provider Vixtel acquires CloudTC
The innovative approach and strategy of smartphones to be deployed on desktops is being developed by Australian VoIP PBX provider Vixtel.
Company has completed the acquisition of CloudTC. Having deployed CloudTC, Vixtel becomes capable to deliver smartphone technology to any destination, including desktop, thus making the product an attractive marketing element with the absolutely understandable operational deisgn. Upon the announcement of the deal’s terms and conditions, Vixtel has incorporated CloudTC as an element of a strategic initiative, in order to make Vixtel to retain its technology development just on premises, also ensuring the maximum efficient control and well-balanced further development. Both entities had been seen cooperating on the innovative Glass 1100, a desk telephone built on the Android, that is designed to support a real smartphone-style performance to a device that's shall to be held on a desktop. The Glass 1100 had been developed in time period of four years, and Vixtel has acquired the whole accumulated experience. Vixtel is about to roll out the next version of the telephony equipment, as company’s officials states that Vixtel is in process of active development of the Glass 2200, which is the quantum leap in the industry. The data from specialists determines, that the Glass 2200 is expected to contain a basic processor, by means of the Linux platform, and to be performed more like a computer, than a smartphone. Nevertheless, the Glass 2200 will not be available until the end of this year, whilst the Glass 1100 is operationally proven. In general terms, Vixtel's current portfolio is considered seriously, therefore, the company can not only deliver VoIP PBX services, but also telephony machines, video conferencing functionalities, call center projects. Company is not expected to be very enthusiastic about the notion of putting the desktop PC into a phone role. However, in some instances, such an approach could be a good idea, and the Glass 1100 system would likely be capable to support management for cases without the hassles. Whilst a phone substituting a desktop positioned PC could be overestimated, there are also numerous opportunities. It just becomes better when the basic notion of deploying this kind of phones as an attachment for PC, instead of substitution, appears on the screen.


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